My great-grandmother, 98, uncovers her anxieties, regrets, and things she’s thankful for amid isolation from the pandemic.

My great-grandmother turned toward me, but her focus was somewhere distant. We sat on the stone wall of her raised garden, staring at the 40-foot pine trees towering over her house; they were knee-high when she planted them over half a century ago. The cold, dry weather wrought strong south-west winds, blowing pine needles across her yard, triggering a bout of anamnesis. Smiling, she said, “one hundred is when I’ll go.” Looking down at her arthritis scathed hand, she murmurs, “that’s… enough for me.” She said something similar when she was nearing 95, although the time of her tone sounds…


Nancy 3. Hoffman put down her Serenelli accordion. “I’ve been trying hard to learn when people are smiling,” she said. As the curator of the world’s only umbrella cover museum, she ends each tour with a song about the beauty of the mundane.

“I could tell you were smiling, thank you,” she told us.

Past the flurry of travelers arriving from the ferry, Nancy’s museum is an unassuming white building; a blandness Nancy counteracts by enthusiastically playing her accordion while wearing a vibrant umbrella-shaped hat to entice wandering mainlanders inside.


Photos by Vincent Aliquo

I came to realize my neighbors were nothing but empty houses. Homes over an extended grassy lot piled high with a diverse collection of belongings — from furniture and books to anniversary gifts. It has been over three years since I found these homes, and only recently, in my quarantined state, has my curiosity grown. Encapsulated in a single photo, a wooden plaque with white, hand-painted letters reading “HAPPY ANNIVERSARY” remains a nagging mystery. Dated 1980, the center of the plaque held two horseshoes, each painted with a couple’s name. Beside it, inside a plastic sleeve, a card dedicated to…


The Nubble, photo by Vincent Aliquo

Maine’s fragmented coast offers a plethora of islands, towns, and attractions. Still, one parcel of land stands out with its surprising background: Bailey Island harbors centuries of fascinating history with its own name going through numerous iterations. The island’s original Algonquian name, issued by the Abenaki tribe, was Newaggin. William Black, a first-generation free black man, was the first settler to assume squatters’ rights to Newaggin in 1758; this ownership is officially acknowledged in Harpswell’s Act of Incorporation in January 1758 as “Will’s Island.” William Black, formerly known as Black Will Jr., was multiracial: his father, Black Will, had an…


Photo by Vincent Aliquo

“It was the first inanimate object I had a moment with,” said Wayne “W.K.” Binger as he leaned over Lucy, his 201–2 Singer sewing machine. Lucy rests atop a wooden sewing table in front of a Lucy Ricardo mural–an association, Wayne explained, that came after he spontaneously named her. As a man, he mentioned, he thought he could clean and buff the machine as he could his Mercedes-Benz, but his “man” approach resulted in the erasure of the intricate gold decals that contoured the cast iron plate. With dramatic fashion, he recalled his disbelief by exclaiming “Oh baby!”, …


Sandford, Dave. “BANE OF THE GREAT LAKES”. https://www.davesandfordphotos.com/collections/lake-erie

A photograph is intriguing, not from how a subject is composed or portrayed, but because of a photographer’s ability to impose emotion in a fleeting moment. Photography is emotionally driven work and reflects the photographer’s subconscious; it is not exclusively an act of capturing images to document moments.

With the technological boom of the 21st century, public accessibility to cameras — such as mobile devices — has ensured the rise of personal photography and created an oversaturation of the quantity of photos we digest daily. The quality of these photos is extremely varied and holds a vastly different weight in…


I am deeply disturbed by the events that unfolded on the 5th of August, and the progression of the protests in Hong Kong since the break-in at the LegCo building. As an American, I admit the bias towards the push for a democratic and independent Hong Kong, but I am upset at the growing string of violent behavior. The police’s excessive use of force has been inexcusable but matching that violence with more violence achieves nothing.

Protestors should not insult those who choose to work instead of protest, not all people have that luxury, nor should they have blocked roads…


“Along with the rise of Xi Jinping, and the desire of Hong Kongers for democracy, the Central Government has already started bringing authoritarian governance to Hong Kong,” a Standing Committee Member of Demosistō, the pro-democracy party, told me. He is referring to the political changes in Hong Kong’s governance due to the impending merger with China in the next couple of decades. Like many, he is concerned that a way of life and cultural identity is under threat by the looming superpower touching Hong Kong’s northern border.

Twenty-one years have passed since Hong Kong became a part of China —…

Vincent Aliquo

Loves writing and taking photos.

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